Can I plant a cutting from a rose bush and have it sprout roots and grow? : The Garden Rose
Recommended:

Can I plant a cutting from a rose bush and have it sprout roots and grow?

I have heard that you can take a cutting of a new shoot off a rose bush and plant it and it will grow. Do I need to do anything to it or should I put it in water until it sprouts roots. I have to trim back one of my favorite rose bushes and would love to have more bushes like this so I wanted to try planting a cutting.

Comments

8 Responses to “Can I plant a cutting from a rose bush and have it sprout roots and grow?”

  1. susieqtemple on May 3rd, 2010 8:08 pm

    I have heard that their is a mixture at the store that you can put it in and it will root.

  2. Needtoknow on May 3rd, 2010 9:04 pm

    At gardening center, purchase root start. It works. Just follow instructions. Hope it helps.

  3. FL Girl185 on May 3rd, 2010 9:20 pm

    I have heard what some of the others are saying. You have to purchase special stuff to put in with it. I have never had any luck just by putting a cutting in the ground.

  4. mel s on May 3rd, 2010 9:37 pm

    It is better if you plant a stem that is still attached, put an end into the ground and then let 2-3 inches come out from the ground on the other side. the part that is in the ground will sprout roots and you will be able to tell when the new plant starts growing. Just dig it up and replant it

  5. g g on May 3rd, 2010 9:51 pm

    my grandma did this to just about every plant she ever had. she didn’t use any special stuff, just water. put the cutting in a glass bowl, tube, etc, with water in it, and place it in the window where it can get a lot of sun. the roots will grow within a couple weeks. then put it in loose potting soil in a small planter or even a large plastic cup, until it’s big enough to place in the ground, or transplant to a bigger planter.

  6. lil_odie66 on May 3rd, 2010 10:08 pm

    you can purchase a root hormone and sphagnum moss dip a FRESH cutting into the hormone then wrap in the moss keep moss moist place in a warm location (not hot) and in a couple weeks the roots should have taken..once roots show place in a jar/bud vase with a 1 tsp of B-1 vitamins you should have a strong root system ready to plant keep protected in fall and winter…mulch..

  7. beneryberlecco on May 3rd, 2010 10:17 pm

    yes But you need to soke it in liquid fertilizer and water for one week or untill it roots

  8. cindymaug on May 3rd, 2010 10:33 pm

    I have started about a couple dozen new rose bushes from my one original bush.

    I take a cutting that’s green, new growth from this year, not the brown stems that are older. I cut it diagonally, dip it in rooting compound and plant it in a pot with potting soil and finely chopped wood chips so it’s a looser soil. And water, water, water it for a month so I know it’s taking root and staying green. I just leave it in a pot all summer on my deck so I can easily keep it watered. In the fall I transplant it to the ground being sure I don’t disturb the root ball that’s forming and plant the entire clump of dirt from the pot. It’s a loose soil, so do it gently.

    I’ll stick 6 or so stems in the same pot so I have a “plant” not just a single stem growing together. It’s not fool proof…. I lose as many as I start. I figure I’m pruning the bush anyways, so why not take all the cuttings and stick them in pots, and hope for the best. I do this with Bleeding hearts too and have dozens of them all from the same bush. Sedums are also very easy to start new plants from just a tiny piece.

    Good luck!

Feel free to leave a comment...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

You must be logged in to post a comment.



certified wildlife habitat

  • Tags



  • Roses Love Garlic: Companion Planting and Other Secrets of Flowers
    Roses Love Garlic: Companion Planting and Other Secrets of Flowers
    Pruning Made Easy: A Gardener's Visual Guide to When and How to Prune Everything
    Pruning Made Easy: A Gardener's Visual Guide to When and How to Prune Everything
    Log in | Register