How do I bring my mini rose bush back to life? : The Garden Rose
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How do I bring my mini rose bush back to life?

Question by Beth W: How do I bring my mini rose bush back to life?
In August a friend of mine gave me a mini rose bush as a gift. I transplanted it, because the pot it was in was getting too small. It did really great for the first few months, but now all of a sudden it’s drying up! Is it because of the fall, and if so, should I do anything special with it like prune it down? Or is the pot it’s in getting too small on the inside and causing this strange behavior? Help!

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Answer by Anne2
My daughter sent me one as a Mothers day gift, and I planted it outside, now it is beautiful. It just did ot do well pot bound.l

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Comments

4 Responses to “How do I bring my mini rose bush back to life?”

  1. Joanne A. W on April 29th, 2011 7:15 am

    Roses look dead during the winter. Put it in a place where the roots will not freeze. You can even put it under an old rug or blanket. Next spring when the nights are in the high 60′s, bring it out into the sunshine and start watering it. Do not let the soil dry out. Mix time-released rose fertilizer into the top soil (follow the directions on the container for potted plants). During the summer, you can water it with rose liquid fertilizer if you wish, BE very sure to mix as directed on the container or it will burn your rose. Do this about every 7 to 14 days.

  2. Sage Mystix on April 29th, 2011 7:48 am

    Pee on it.

  3. sptfyr on April 29th, 2011 8:00 am

    Your rose is probably root bound and needs to be in a larger pot or the ground. Just remember that if there is green then there is hope so don’t give up on it yet. Prune it back to 3-4 inches and plant it in the ground where it can get full sun. Make sure you remove the old soil from the roots and gently spread them apart and trim away any brown or black roots leaving only the white and creamy colored roots. Dig a hole and pile a mound of soil in the center and spread the roots over the mound, but not in a circular pattern. Fill in the hole with soil and water well. Lay a thick layer of straw around the base of the rose to help insulate it from winter freezes. Once you rose is established this won’t be necessary.

    Good Luck

  4. Lord Charles on April 29th, 2011 8:53 am

    Don’t do anything. Just cut back the dead wood, water it, and leave it ’til next spring and see what comes up.

    You will be amazed at just how hardy roses are – they do not require anything like the ‘mother hen’ attention that they often get – most end up being mothered to death.

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