How do you regrow roses from a rose bush that you like, the style of rose bush I have is called a florabunda? : The Garden Rose
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How do you regrow roses from a rose bush that you like, the style of rose bush I have is called a florabunda?

I have one florabunda rose growing bush growing if front of my home. I love the red rose petals it gives year round. Very hardy in this Texas weather. I wanted to get more bushes of this type but they run out or do not have any. I wanted to find out if its possible to regrow from this particular rose bush. How do you do it ? Where do I plant for it to grow some roots? Do I have to do this in the season of Spring only?

Comments

4 Responses to “How do you regrow roses from a rose bush that you like, the style of rose bush I have is called a florabunda?”

  1. Life_is_temporary on May 11th, 2010 9:23 pm

    You can do it in any season and you shouldn’t move the bush or this wont work…Get some triple distilled smirnoff vodka and pour 1 shot (1.5 oz.) around the bush daily. Do that for no more than 2 weeks and then wait and let it grow…

  2. kearneyconsulting on May 11th, 2010 9:29 pm

    Most roses can be grown from a branch planted in good amended soil and watered well.

  3. Karen S on May 11th, 2010 9:43 pm

    Why not try airlayering it? It sounds complicated, but its fairly simple!
    HOW DOES IT WORK?
    The leaves make nutrients from the sun and send it down the phloem tissue (a greenish substance located just under the bark) to the roots. When this “pipeline” is cut and kept moist the nutrients will collect at that point and in ten days form a callus from which the roots will develop. The air-layered part will still receive its water and nutrients from the roots through the xylem tissue located inside the woody part of the stem.
    Some advantages of air-layering are higher percentage of success, a jump-start in plant growth by at least two years, stronger root system, very low cost, no “baby sitting” cuttings, and you get personal satisfaction when you see the fast results.
    You will need:
    Sphagnum moss or Jiffy Peat Pellet (soaked in water)
    -Sharp knife
    Rootone (liquid or powder)
    A small brush
    Clear plastic sheet (6″ x 10″) or sandwich bag (cut open)
    Twist-ties
    Plant labels
    PROCEDURE:
    Choose a green, pencil-size stem and make a safe area to work in by removing thorns, leaves, and branches
    About 1/4″ below a leaf node, make a cut around the stem and 1″ below that make another cut. Then remove the bark between the two cuts.With the knife blade, scrape the wood, making sure the bark and the green tissue is completely removed or it may not develop roots.
    Brush on Rootone
    Wrap with the clear plastic sheet making small pleats as you go around the stem, forming a sack. Then 5/8″ below the cut area, snugly twist-tie it. (Not too tight in order to allow the plant to expand).
    Pull the plastic sheet down to expose the site. This makes it easier to place the moss around the cut.
    Squeeze out water from a handful of moss or a Jiffy Peat Pellet pot until just moist.
    Form a wad about the size of your palm or make a vertical tear down the Jiffy Pot.Wrap moss or Jiffy Pot 3/4″ above and below the bare stem.
    Pull up the plastic and straighten, making sure it is air and water-tight.
    Secure top with the twist-tie (Not too tight in order to allow the plant to expand).
    Label your plant as desired (plant name, color, type, date, etcLabel your plant as desired (plant name, color, type, date, etc.)
    Periodically examine the layer. Most rose plants show their white roots beneath the plastic sheet after 21 days, some may take longer.
    You can do this, Spring- early summer! Good luck!

  4. TekoaG on May 11th, 2010 9:46 pm

    Cut a long sprig from the rose bush that doesn’t have any blooms or rosebuds and stick the end in a raw, unpeeled white potato, then plant the potato in the ground where you want your new rose bush. Not only will you get a new rose bush, but you may even get a potato plant for your trouble!!

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