Trimming Roses in Southern California? : The Garden Rose
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Trimming Roses in Southern California?

Question by kouneli: Trimming Roses in Southern California?
I live right outside of Los Angeles, and just moved into a house that has many rose bushes. I would like to continue caring for these overgrown rose bushes, but would like to know what time of year is best to trim them down drastically?

Also, if you have any other tips, please let me know.
im_smart: I moved to Santa Clarita Valley :) Small world.

meanolmaw: I know that most of them are Iceberg roses, and there are 4 other rose bushes that have the same look and growth, but different colors (light pink, dark magenta, golden yellow). I honestly have no idea what kind they are. I have even brought clippings into 2 local nurseries, but even they couldn’t tell. I know for sure they aren’t climbing roses, seeing that my Grandpa used to keep climbing roses, and these aren’t anything like those.

Best answer:

Answer by im_smart
I moved from Santa Clarita Los Angeles in the beginning of this year. Its a drastically hot place, and so for my roses i trimmed them down right after the flowers showed signs of “old-ness” (like brown spots, decaying petals, dehydration). I know its hard to cut off the flowers and buds right after they’ve bloomed because they’re so pretty, but its better for the flower so it can grow. Time of the year….probably at the end of winter, or beginning of spring so the plant can “start fresh”.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Comments

2 Responses to “Trimming Roses in Southern California?”

  1. florina on May 13th, 2011 8:18 pm

    congrats on your new house and on the beautiful rose bushes…roses are best to be trimmed in the spring…

  2. meanolmaw on May 13th, 2011 8:21 pm

    overgrown?… are you sure?… or could that be a climbing or rambling rose?… you need to allow them to grow and show you what they are, before you go pruning them ‘drastically’…..

    some may be one time bloomers and cutting at the wrong time could remove all the flowers for the next bloom…

    some, like climbers, need to have their second year growth in order to bloom on it….

    some need cut back to perhaps two ft or so, like hybrid teas, but none that I know of enjoy or do well with a ‘drastic’ pruning….. you always run the risk of getting into a root stock graft and ruining the plant….. why not tie them out of your way for now and let them grow and bloom thru a year while you figure out what kind they are and what care they need….??……besides water and fertilizer, that is….

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